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In Memoriam

We received the message below from longtime Village Temple member Mimi Abrams, whose beloved father Sol Abrams died last week, on August 31, at age 92. Mr. Abrams led a fascinating life, worth reading about. His obituary noted: “Throughout his life, he helped those in need and championed civil rights, becoming one of the first theater owners in Georgia to integrate. His daughters said his sense of fairness came in large part from being the son of immigrants in the wave of Jewish merchants in small Southern towns who understood the injustice of discrimination.” You can read the entire piece by clicking the link in Mimi’s note: 

 

Dear Family and Friends,

See link below for Sol Abrams (my dear Daddy) Obituary in Atlanta Journal Constitution today.  There is also an Athens Obituary:

google:  online athens obituaries and type in Sol Abrams. 

://www.myajc.com/news/news/local-obituaries/sol-abrams-92-cinema-owner-loved-movies-music-fami/nsSLk/

May his memory forever be a blessing!

Thank you all for your love, kindness and support!

Love,

MIMI and Family

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New Beginnings

On Friday night Rabbi Deborah Hirsch stepped onto the bimah for the first time as spiritual leader of The Village Temple. As it happened, that Erev Shabbat coincided with Erev Fourth of July weekend, not quite propitious timing for starting a new job!!  Happily, a great many of you chose to begin the holiday by welcoming Rabbi Hirsch to our community. The sanctuary was delightfully full—not just with people, but with good will and open hearts. Accompanied by the beautiful music of Anita Hollander and Holland Hamilton, Rabbi Hirsch conducted a moving, intelligent service that invited participation as well as introspection. With eloquence and respect, she spoke about the importance of healing, for our little congregation and for the large, troubled world around us. 

This summer you have the opportunity to have a voice in directing the future course of The Village Temple. Please come to one of several small gatherings taking place in congregant homes for conversation and connection with fellow congregants. Rabbi Hirsch will lead discussions that will allow you to talk about your experiences and hopes for the synagogue, what would make you feel more engaged, why is it important to you. Supper will be served at the evening get-togethers.

Two dates have already filled up. Please reserve as soon as possible, so your hosts can begin to plan. To RSVP please email Sandy Albert in the VT office This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or call 212-674-2340.

Tues. morning 7/19—11 a.m to 12:30 a.m

Thursday evening 7/21  6:30 pm to 8:00 pm

Tues. morning 7/26—11 a.m to 12:30 a.m

Tues. evening 7/26 – 6:30 pm to 8:00 pm

Mon. evening 6/6 6:30 pm to 8:300 pm

Thursday evening 8/11 –6:30 pm to 8:00 pm

Please indicate your top two preferred dates and times. You will be notified of the date, time and location a few days in advance.

Meanwhile, we encourage you to come to services when you can over the summer. Anita and Cantor Nancy Bach and guest musicians will join Rabbi Hirsch in making Shabbat at The Village Temple inspirational and engaging,  a lovely respite from the hubbub of everyday life.

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Summer Plans

While Religious School may be finished for the year, The Village Temple is open all year round. Our summer services are always a special pleasure, with guest appearances by wonderful musicians and the opportunity to meet Rabbi Deborah Hirsch, our interim rabbi. Rabbi Hirsch’s official start date is July 1, which happens to be Erev Shabbat. Skip the holiday traffic and start July 4 weekend at The Village Temple. Come to Friday night services on July 1 to welcome Rabbi Hirsch and then head out for wherever you are going!!

We have emerged from this difficult year stronger and smarter about community engagement. You are invited to participate in one of several opportunities to meet with Rabbi Hirsch in small groups, to discuss what you would like the Village Temple to be. Most of these gatherings will take place in the home of members, and will be part business, part social. This will allow you to be part of an important conversation about the synagogue’s purpose and meaning, as well as the chance to get to know fellow congregants. Please attend these sessions, so your voices can be heard. 

The information gathered at these meetings will provide guidance to the search committee for a full time rabbi. Thanks to the following congregants who have volunteered for this important task. They represent the spectrum that makes up The Village Temple: long-time and recent members; grandparents, families; singles; interfaith families; experts in Jewish ritual and those at the beginning of their learning journey: Sarah King, Marina Levin, David Caceres, Rachel Glube/David Friedman, Gabrielle Haskell, Esther Siegel, Alizah Brozgold, Mickey Rindler, Adrienne Koch, Jamil Simon, Fred Basch, Larry Klurfeld, Sandi Tamny, Dean Chavooshian. (The co-presidents will be ex-officio members.)

This group will have the task of creating a job description, based on your input, and then managing the process outlined by the Central Conference of American Rabbis. They will be reporting to the congregation along the way, to keep you fully informed.

Please let us know if you have any questions. Look forward to seeing all of you soon.

 

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Rabbi Hirsch on the Tragedy in Orlando

Dear Village Temple community,

We are sharing a note Rabbi Deborah Hirsch sent to her congregation at Shararay Tefilla yesterday upon learning of the tragic events in Orlando (Rabbi Hirsch begins as our interim rabbi on July 1.)

From Rabbi Hirsch:

It was with disbelief that I woke on this Shavuot morning and heard the news of the mass shooting at the Pulse Orlando Bar.  When I left for services this morning, the death toll was at twenty.  When I returned home three hours later, the number had climbed to fifty dead and fifty-three injured—many who are listed in critical condition. 

Today, Jews across the world listened to the chanting of the Ten Commandments, a set of rules embraced by multiple faiths.  The sixth commandment, Lo TIrtzach—you shall not murder, was transgressed at least fifty times early this morning. The president and media called the slaughter ‘the worst mass shooting massacre in American history’.  Today’s tragedy must lift up for us the value of human life and we must raise our voices against senseless violent acts that not only cut short the lives of innocent men and women, but eclipses God’s presence in our world. This deadly assault occurred in the shadow of the upcoming first anniversary of the historic gay legislation that secured the rights of LGBT citizens in our country.  Sadly, we know we can legislate laws but we cannot legislate an end to hatred.  Clearly, today’s terror was a hate crime—a reminder that it is incumbent upon all of us to champion the rights of those who face discrimination in our land. 

I know there are gun debates across our country and there are those in our congregation who represent both sides of that debate.  Having said that, I truly hope we can all raise our voices in solidarity against horrific mass murder—that we can distinguish between the possession of a gun and the possession of an assault weapon, whose sole purpose is not to defend, but to snuff out dozens of lives in a single breath—leaving carnage and pain and misery for so many. 

May God grant comfort to all who are in shock this day—to all who are wounded—to family members who will mourn the loss of loved ones—to first responders who forever will be haunted by the images they witnessed.  May God grant them strength to endure their pain and may God send healing that will embrace them with memories of love. 

L’shalom,

Rabbi Deborah Hirsch

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Parshat Emor: Dvar Torah by Alizah Brozgold

This week's Torah portion from Leviticus names and describes the sacred festivals of the Jewish year: Shabbat, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Pesach, Shavuot, and Sukkot. As Elyse Goldstein writes in her commentary on the URJ website, these sacred festivals invest time with holiness and declare ourselves as active partners with God.

In another commentary by Rachel Mikva, she adds the point that these holy days are holy because they don't "await our convenience" and don't accommodate our own personal schedules.  As Jews celebrating a holiday, "We have an appointment, so we drop everything and show up. That's part of what makes it special." 

She also quotes the Midrash Tanchuma that asks "whether we keep these appointments for God or for ourselves. The paradoxical response is that they are wholly for our own enjoyment . . . because the Holy One wants us to keep showing up (B'reishit 4)."

The question of showing up is an important one and is critical to how we define ourselves as Reform Jews in 2016.  How do we create spiritually and socially meaningful experiences in our shul that will get people to show up? One way is clearly....Jazz Synaplex! Jazz is the perfect musical medium for Jews because it's all about improvisation - something that is central to Jewish culture and religion and our historical status as wanderers, as we constantly needed to adapt to the mores and traditions around us. We are always striking a balance - between our ancient melodies and our new riffs on those old tunes.

Jazz, too, has some Jewish roots. Reading about Jews and jazz in one of Nat Hentoff's JazzTimes columns, for example, he wrote about how Artie Shaw's longtime jazz theme song actually was based on a cantorial niggun. The improvising chazzans in Orthodox synagogues sang a kind of "soul music" that connects us not only to jazz but to American blues as well.

Every generation of Jews needs to find its own voice to remain vital, its own ways to inspire people to show up. This year, as our community collectively and metaphorically composes what songs we want to sing, I imagine there will be lots of improvisation.

And all of your voices are needed! As Henry Van Dyke, an educator, once said, "Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang except those who sang best."

We need all your voices and we need you all to show up...because the shul must go on!

Shabbat Shalom!

 

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