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After the Holocaust

At last Friday night’s Shabbat services, The Village Temple commemorated the Shoah with quiet power and poignancy. Through words, music and poetry, Alizah Brozgold, Cantor Bach and Anita Hollander created an evocative stream of memory that connected the hopeful beauty of Shabbat with the horrible events being recalled. Perhaps most touching were the readings and songs from the children of the Terezin concentration camp, brought back to life by choir members Rachel Hendrickson and Emma Basch. It felt appropriate that on this memorial evening we were also celebrating the bat mitzvah of Sasha Beutler, looking to the future as we remember the past. These young people may be the best answer to the question hauntingly posed by Elie Wiesel:  “But who will be the last survivor, the last to tell the tale, the one who, like the prophet Jeremiah, said, “I am he, I was there.” Who will be our witness? What will happen to our legacy?”

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Interim Rabbi News

On Wednesday, April 13, the Village Temple community voted (51 yes, 1 abstention) to approve Rabbi Deborah Hirsch as our interim rabbi, beginning July 1. This is a poignant moment, as we move toward our congregation’s future while appreciating the past 17 years under Rabbi Koster’s leadership.

The next year will offer our congregation an opportunity for self-examination and renewal. Rabbi Hirsch will be an able guide through this process. She brings an impressive array of experience, with more than 25 years as a congregational Rabbi, including 15 years at East End Temple and 6 years at Sharaay T’fila. In addition, she has worked for the Union of Reform Judaism, and has a deep well of knowledge about the wider Jewish world. Those who meet her are struck by her wisdom, ability to listen deeply, intuition, warmth, and sense of humor. You will have many opportunities to meet her and her wife Carole in large groups and small. Please join us in welcoming this exceptional leader to our community.

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Restoration and Remembrance

In her poignant, exquisite book Beloved Dog, the artist/author Maira Kalman says this about the death of her husband:  “When Tibor died, the world came to an end. And the world did not come to an end. That is something you learn.” Kalman’s words came to mind on Sunday, April 3, during the memorial gathering for Village Temple member Ze’ev Mehler, husband of Nathalie Horowicz-Mehler, father of Elan, Jessye, Sarah, Yoav, Noa and Yael.   At an evocative service led by Rabbi Koster, Ze’ev’s family and friends recalled what the world was like with Ze’ev, a passionate man who made every minute matter. Friends were his oxygen, Nathalie said. He lived for his family, his friends said. He taught by example that what you loved had to be embraced. Besides his friends and family he loved music, motorcycles, New York, history, conversation, community and the pure excitement of making things happen, lighting a spark. This was not a man who dipped his toes in the stream of life. He dove in with relish—and made everyone want to jump in with him. When Ze’ev died, the world didn’t come to an end and neither did he. That was evident in the memories shared, the inspiration he gave.

Ze’ev’s memorial was part of a weekend of restoration and remembrance at The  Village Temple. At Friday night services the community officially thanked Judy Steinman for underwriting the refurbishment of the synagogue’s Torahs in honor of her late husband Ralph Steinman, a longtime member who served twice as temple president. Artist and sofer Neal Yerman spoke eloquently about the relationship between the physical Torah and the meaning contained in the letters and words. Sofer Yerman returned to the VT Sunday morning to demonstrate his craft and the concepts behind it to religious school students and their families. Having this event take place the same day as Ze’ev’s memorial felt like a consecration of our community and what it stands for.

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On Being Grateful in the Moment: Dvar Torah by Alizah Brozgold

Dvar Torah

Parshat Tzav

3/26/16

This week's Torah portion, Tzav (from the Hebrew word, 'command') continues the commandments related to ritual sacrifices. Remember there were different kinds of sacrifices for different circumstances, and one was called the "sacrifice of well-being" or "peace offering". Nehama Leibowitz, a contemporary biblical commentator, points out that the sacrifice of well-being was unusual for having no request or petition connected to it. The offerer brought a gift, yet asked nothing of God, motivated simply by, in her words, ". . . an abundance of joy and gratitude."

The people were commanded to eat the sacrifice of well-being on the day in which it was offered. We read (Leviticus 7:15), "And the flesh of the thanksgiving sacrifice of well-being shall be eaten on the day that it is offered; none of it shall be set aside until morning." 

So why would we be required to eat the sacrifice of well-being on the day in which it is offered? If the sacrifice symbolizes a miracle in the life of the one who brings it - as some biblical commentators have argued - it makes sense to me that the ceremony of eating the sacrifice would be done on the same day. It emphasizes that a moment of gratitude and well-being needs to be acknowledged 'in that very moment', without delay. In so doing, it emphasizes the importance, immediacy, and primacy of our thanksgiving. 

This led me to muse on the times in my life that I hadn't stated my gratitude 'in the moment'. How many times did I think about the love and support given me by my family, friends, and colleagues without saying a word, perhaps planning a special future acknowledgement or expression of gratitude? How many times did it come to pass that I never had the chance to express it and deeply regretted that missed opportunity? 

It also made me think of how the expression of gratitude and well-being can quickly become a wonderful chain reaction. It's like holding the door for someone with a smile and seeing the person behind you doing the same thing for the person behind them. Similarly, when we express our gratitude to someone, it often leads to their acknowledging their gratitude to us. The gift of well-being and gratitude is truly a gift that 'keeps on giving'.

Knowing human psychology, even if we do express our gratitude 'in the moment', we are often back to our old complaining, ungrateful selves a few minutes later. This is exemplified by the story of Sadie and her grandson. One sunny day, as they were walking along the beach in Miami together, an enormous wave suddenly came along and swept up little Joshua into the ocean. Sadie looked up at the heavens and railed at God. A moment later, another wave came along and safely deposited her precious grandson on the shore. Sadie looked toward heaven in gratitude, then looked down again, yelling back up to God, "He had a hat!"

May our offerings of well-being and gratitude be given in a timely way and may they, in turn, evoke well-being and gratitude in others. Amen.          

Shabbat Shalom!

 

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Purim spectacular!!

The Village Temple is rocking the house for Purim this year! 

Last night’s Megillah reading and Purimspiel made for an incredible evening, thanks to the talent, creativity, hard work, and enthusiasm of our choir kids and the many adults who planned and performed. Special kudos to Mickey Rindler, who wrote the VT adaptation of “Frozen” with great panache; the performers who put on a chillingly fabulous show; Tina Ball who did a masterful job of herding cats and other delightful creatures. The sanctuary was packed with adults and children. You could see how much fun everyone was having by the fact that it seemed like half the kids in the audience tried to climb up on stage at one point or another. And hats off to Alex Tansky, the best sport ever, onstage and off. 

Cantor Nancy Bach led a lovely service. And while Anita Hollander is performing in Chicago, her incredible daughter Holland Hamilton carried on in style, leading the children’s choir to new heights (with a lovely assist from guitarist Jonny Kunis). Talk about l’dor v’dor!!! The choir was just amazing—truly a sign that spring is here. 

Special thanks to Sandy Albert, who has been working double/triple-time to keep things running, publicize our events, handle our books, and represent the VT with singular grace and intelligence. 

By the time the evening was over our faces hurt from smiling so much. Thank you all for demonstrating so beautifully what a dynamic community we are blessed with at The Village Temple. 

And the fun continues on Friday, March 25, with our adult Purim Celebration. Come in costume, mask (or not), and join the fun, with services followed by Haman’s hat hors d’oeuvres, cocktails, live music and dancing. Childcare provided!

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