Gay Pride Shabbat

It’s hard to believe that just over a year has passed since the Orlando massacre at the Pulse Night Club. On June 12, 2016, Omar Mateen murdered 49 individuals and injured 58 others during an anti-gay shooting rampage that surreally pierced the soul of the city known for Tinkerbell, Harry Potter and Mickey Mouse. It was a painful reminder that despite the defeat of DOMA (Defense of Marriage Act) in 2013 and the embrace many In the LGBTQ community have felt, anti-gay sentiment is still palpable within our country. The November elections signaled a green light of intolerance for Muslims, immigrants, Blacks, Jews and those in the LGBTQ community, to mention a just a few groups.

Fifty-eight years ago, the Stonewall Riots down the street from our temple, launched the Gay Rights Movement. Fifty-eight years later, despite a resurgence of xenophobia and anti-gay rhetoric in our country, we can be proud of the strides made in guaranteeing Gay rights and normalizing gay relationships. As a Reform Jewish congregation can also be proud of the strides made in Judaism both to counter biblical quotes taken out of context and to embrace LGBTQ Jews into our synagogues, homes and families. I always smile when I read the Sunday Styles section of the New York Times and see listings of more than one Gay couple that stood under the chupah.

Gay pride weekend beckons us to celebrate the advancement of Gay Rights across the country and in our own community.

On Friday, June 23rd at 6:45, join us at the Village Temple for a special Gay Pride Shabbat. We pride ourselves on being a diverse and accepting community. Through music, liturgy and readings we will celebrate this important milestone in human rights. I will share some personal reflections and provide a backdrop of Reform Judaism’s early struggle with Gay Rights and its ultimate embrace, celebration and unwavering support for the LGBTQ community.

Judy Garland died a week before Stonewall and has been heralded as a Gay Icon. Cruise ships hold gatherings for Friends of Dorothy—opportunities for the LGBTQ community to meet and mingle. Her classic song—Over the Rainbow—was a beacon of hope for so many during the early days of the Gay Movement and still kindles a spark of hope in so many hearts today.

Show your Pride and be with us on June 23.

 

Share this article:

The Secret Ingredient
From Mensch to Mensch