In Memoriam – Paul Aiken

On Tuesday, Feb. 2, The Village Temple sanctuary was packed with friends, family, and admirers of Paul Aiken, a VT congregant who died on January 29, one day before his 57th birthday. Paul spent the last two years of his life battling Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease. He approached the diagnosis the way he lived his life—refusing to accept conventional wisdom and trying to make the world a better place. He was not Jewish but lived and breathed the values of tikkun olam. Paul established a blog, n=2.com, to record his fight against the disease which included taking a number of alternative cures. In addition to the blog, Aiken made n=2.com into a foundation with the aim of “building a global ALS community.” To remember Paul, donations can be made to MAC Angels and Project ALS. Rabbi Koster led a beautiful memorial service which elicited as many laughs as tears, appropriate to Paul’s character and his beautiful, spirited family: Stefanie his wife and his children, A.J., Will, and Melanie. His college roommate and lifelong friend recalled Paul as a man who took deep satisfaction from everyday pleasures—a satisfying bike ride, a sunny afternoon in New York, the Chicago Cubs playing baseball, a hot dog and papaya drink from Gray’s. “This is a good day,” Paul would declare. But his impact was far from ordinary. As executive director of the Author’s Guild for almost 20 years, Paul led the guild in a lawsuit against Google that charged the company’s library book scanning project was copyright infringement. The case continues in the courts. In a statement about Paul, guild president Roxana Robinson noted that “Brilliant and fierce can change the world, but it’s generosity that makes it a better place. For twenty years Paul worked to make the world a better place for writers, readers and everyone else affected by the written word.”