On Being Grateful in the Moment: Dvar Torah by Alizah Brozgold

Dvar Torah

Parshat Tzav

3/26/16

This week’s Torah portion, Tzav (from the Hebrew word, ‘command’) continues the commandments related to ritual sacrifices. Remember there were different kinds of sacrifices for different circumstances, and one was called the “sacrifice of well-being” or “peace offering”. Nehama Leibowitz, a contemporary biblical commentator, points out that the sacrifice of well-being was unusual for having no request or petition connected to it. The offerer brought a gift, yet asked nothing of God, motivated simply by, in her words, “. . . an abundance of joy and gratitude.”

The people were commanded to eat the sacrifice of well-being on the day in which it was offered. We read (Leviticus 7:15), “And the flesh of the thanksgiving sacrifice of well-being shall be eaten on the day that it is offered; none of it shall be set aside until morning.”

So why would we be required to eat the sacrifice of well-being on the day in which it is offered? If the sacrifice symbolizes a miracle in the life of the one who brings it – as some biblical commentators have argued – it makes sense to me that the ceremony of eating the sacrifice would be done on the same day. It emphasizes that a moment of gratitude and well-being needs to be acknowledged ‘in that very moment’, without delay. In so doing, it emphasizes the importance, immediacy, and primacy of our thanksgiving.

This led me to muse on the times in my life that I hadn’t stated my gratitude ‘in the moment’. How many times did I think about the love and support given me by my family, friends, and colleagues without saying a word, perhaps planning a special future acknowledgement or expression of gratitude? How many times did it come to pass that I never had the chance to express it and deeply regretted that missed opportunity?

It also made me think of how the expression of gratitude and well-being can quickly become a wonderful chain reaction. It’s like holding the door for someone with a smile and seeing the person behind you doing the same thing for the person behind them. Similarly, when we express our gratitude to someone, it often leads to their acknowledging their gratitude to us. The gift of well-being and gratitude is truly a gift that ‘keeps on giving’.

Knowing human psychology, even if we do express our gratitude ‘in the moment’, we are often back to our old complaining, ungrateful selves a few minutes later. This is exemplified by the story of Sadie and her grandson. One sunny day, as they were walking along the beach in Miami together, an enormous wave suddenly came along and swept up little Joshua into the ocean. Sadie looked up at the heavens and railed at God. A moment later, another wave came along and safely deposited her precious grandson on the shore. Sadie looked toward heaven in gratitude, then looked down again, yelling back up to God, “He had a hat!”

May our offerings of well-being and gratitude be given in a timely way and may they, in turn, evoke well-being and gratitude in others. Amen.

Shabbat Shalom!